Siri Hustvedt

Author, Essayist

Siri Hustvedt is the author of a book of poems, Reading to You, three books of essays, Mysteries of the Rectangle: Essays on Painting, A Plea for Eros, and Living, Thinking, Looking; a work of nonfiction, The Shaking Woman or A History of My Nerves; and six novels: The Blindfold, The Enchantment of Lily Dahl, What I Loved, The Sorrows of an American, The Summer Without Men, and The Blazing World. Her work has been nominated for numerous prizes, including the Femina Etranger in France. The Blazing World was long listed for the 2014 Man Booker Prize and nominated for the Kirkus Prize. In 2012, she received the International Gabarron Prize for Thought and Humanities. She has a PhD in English literature from Columbia University. She has also published papers in scientific journals, including Neuropsychoanalysis and Clinical Neurophysiology. In 2014, she was appointed a lecturer in psychiatry at the Dewitt Wallace Institute for the History of Psychiatry at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. Her work has been translated into over thirty languages. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Participant In:

Aby Warburg: Art, Neuroscience, and Psychoanalysis: Day 2

Sunday, October 13th
9:30 - 4:15PM

Past Event

This two-day symposium explores Warburg’s ideas and their adumbrations, e.g., his preoccupations with – and intuitions about – memory, both in relation to different forms of artistic creation and in anticipation of concepts related to neuroplasticity and neuroesthetics; the significance and fluency of the image – its elliptical and metaphoric functions – and of affect… read more »

Curiosity

Saturday, March 14, 2015
2:30-4:30 pm

Past Event

Curiosity has been seen through the ages as the impulse that drives our knowledge forward and the temptation that leads us toward dangerous and forbidden waters. The question “Why?” has appeared under a multiplicity of guises and in vastly different contexts throughout the chapters of human history. Why does evil exist? What is beauty? How does language… read more »